Posts tagged 'glassware'

DWK safety blog - working safely with pressure
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DWK safety blog - working safely with pressure

Working with pressure/vacuum conditions in the lab is common but not all products are designed to withstand this. Products with appropriate geometry and wall thickness are suitable for working safely with pressure. For example, filtering flasks, desiccators, or flat flange vessels, as well as products like the DURAN® pressure plus+ range of bottles. These provide guaranteed vacuum and pressure...
Inspecting Laboratory Glassware
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DWK Safety Blog - Inspecting Laboratory Glassware

Laboratory glassware is often repeatedly used in the laboratory which can lead to stress and general wear and tear. Inspecting laboratory glassware for any signs of damage can prevent injury. This blog will cover some indications that could suggest that the glassware has been damaged, how to carry out an inspection and how to dispose of damaged lab glassware safely. Pyrex Quickfit Kohlrausc...
DWK safety tips – Jointed Glassware
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DWK safety tips - Jointed Glassware

Distillation, extraction, filtration and reflux processes require various complexities of laboratory glassware assemblies, using interchangeable jointed glassware. This safety blog will cover the various types of jointed glassware available, and explore basic techniques for its safe maintenance. Pyrex Quickfit jointed glassware Types of jointed glassware explained Jointed glassware ca...
DWK safety blog – autoclaving glass bottles
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DWK safety blog - autoclaving glass bottles

An autoclave is a specialised piece of equipment which is a physical method for disinfection and sterilisation. The process is achieved using a combination of steam, high pressure, and time. Steam is effective at transferring thermal energy (compared to dry air) and can sterilise a load at 121°C in just 15 minutes. The majority of laboratory glass bottles are suitable for autoclaving. Howev...
DWK guide to cleaning lab glassware
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DWK guide to cleaning lab glassware

It is important to clean laboratory glassware as it has frequent contact with a range of substances on a repeated basis. A robust cleaning process is needed to ensure the equipment can be re-used safely, as well as helping to prolong the life of the products used and protects the validity of future work. Cleaning of glassware can be carried out manually, with the use of automated washing eq...
heating laboratory glass
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DWK safety tips and tricks - heating laboratory glass

Heating glassware is an important topic as heat can change the volume of the glassware if the temperature used is too high. The maximum temperature for heating the glass depends on the specifications and what type of glass is used. For example, borosilicate glassware provides a lower coefficient of expansion than other glass types such as soda lime glass. Another note is that not all glassware...
DWKs Safety Badges
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Understanding DWKs 'Go Safe, Trust in DWK' Safety Badges

The new DWK campaign aims to assist in user safety with their products. Using the slogan 'Go Safe, Trust In DWK', this range of products have safety features with clear benefits to the user compared to standard items. To assist in understanding what benefits certain items can offer you, DWK have created safety badges which categorise different features. These are: Built stronger, safer hand...
QUICKFIT® Jointed Laboratory Glassware
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QUICKFIT® Jointed Laboratory Glassware: Understanding the Different Types and when to use them

Glassware has become ubiquitous in laboratory experiments thanks to its many favourable qualities. It is inert, transparent, is chemically and heat-resistant, and available in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. From round-bottom flasks and fractionating columns to condensers, bubblers and extractors, laboratory glassware serves many functions. Thi...
Soxhlet extraction apparatus
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How do I set up Soxhlet extraction apparatus?

Soxhlet extraction is used for extracting a compound of low solubility from a solid sample (typically natural or environmental samples such as soil, sediment and more). It was invented by Franz von Soxhlet in 1879 for the extraction of a lipid from a solid sample and has since become widely used the world over. The Soxhlet extraction method uses a number of different glassware pieces. A Soxhlet...
Laboratory Glassware
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A quick guide to Classifications of Laboratory Glassware

Volumetric Glassware Laboratory glassware can be manufactured from Borosilicate and Soda-lime glass. Soda lime glass  is generally used for Class B products or where long term exposure to chemicals is unlikely. Class A Borosilicate volumetric glassware has superior thermal and chemical resistance and is better suited to glassware for storage of solutions, e.g. flasks. The use of  Class A boros...
Quickfit® Glassware
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Q: My Quickfit® Glassware joint sizes do not match, what can I do?

A: Use one of the Quickfit® expansion or reduction adapters Quickfit® glassware comes with a range of joint sizes. When the joint size of one piece of glassware match with that of another, connecting them within your set up is easy. However, things may not be so straightforward and some items may only come in a limited choice of joint sizes. In this case, there is a handy range of reduction ...

Interchangeable Laboratory Glassware
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Interchangeable Laboratory Glassware - Quickfit® Understanding the Connections

How often have you spent time trying to find the right pieces of glassware to fit together to construct your set-up? A Flexible Interchangeable Range Quickfit® back in 1934 pioneered the idea of interchangeable laboratory glassware based on set joint sizes aimed to tackle this issue. Today this range comprises of over 1000 products, most of which feature their signature conical ground glass joi...
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